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My Articles of Faith

NOTE: This is an old version of my values. There are two newer versions published here:

Life’s Purpose:

The primary purpose of my life is the pursuit of Joy.

Secondary to that is the pursuit of truth, by which I have faith that I’ll be better able to control the environment of my life, affording me greater opportunity to achieve my primary purpose.

My faith:

I have great faith in humanity. In sum, I see the world as a positive place, and am happy that I am a part of it. I believe that humanity is a positive force in this world.

It is my belief that all great human achievements are rooted entirely in the greatness of humankind. I do not look to sources external to humanity to explain or understand its value.

I have faith that humankind will continue to gain increased knowledge relative to the nature of our existence, the nature of nature, and the means by which we will gain increased power over nature to improve our lives. Science is generally the object of this faith.

I have faith in my ability to shape the contours of my life, as well as to contribute to the makeup of the communities of which I am a part.

I have faith in the ability of pluralistic democracies to provide the greatest foundation for the pursuit of joy. My faith is that through continued work and human capital, we can build a more perfect union. To this end, I am faithfully involved in the political process.

I have faith in the equality of humanity, that all should be equal and that all deserve rights which are endowed upon them naturally. All should have equal opportunity to create the shape and contour of their lives.

I don’t believe that the ends or goals of humanity are guaranteed; I believe in the real possibility of failure. I believe that we are in a race against time to avoid failure, and this motivates my faith.

My communities:
Individuals preside over communities, which are created to serve the needs of individuals. Though symbiotic, we must never elevate “community” to the ontological status of “individual;” they are fundamentally different things.

My first and most important communal tie is to my wife, Mary, and to my two children, Cien and Aris.

I am a member of the entire human family, whom I consider to be brothers and sisters.

Additional communities of which I am a part: family, friends, neighborhood, City, County, State, and Country.

I identify with the struggles of specific communities, such as the gay-lesbian community. I identify with the struggle for equality waged by women. I identify with the struggle for equality waged by the minority communities.

I don’t consider myself detached from the struggles faced by these communities, as I feel that fundamentally, the struggle for equality is a struggle faced by all of us. That my current demographic is at the top of the hill does not mean that it will always be so, and to that end, I work hard to ensure equality for all.

  • Timothy, do you still consider yourself to be a part of a Mormon community (as opposed to the “official” LDS Mormon community)?

  • To any degree that I am, it is by definition and not necessarily by choice.

    I have family and friends, and an entire history wrapped around the mormon faith. My ancestors crossed the plains with Brigham Young.

    But, I am no longer an active member of any organized aspect of mormonism.

  • What do would call the community you and I share? Is it Mormon? Something else?

  • I call it a discussion group organized around mormon themes.

    What do you call it?

  • That sounds about right.

  • Is the community not more multi-faceted and significant than “a discussion group”? That seems to me to be a remarkably sterile view.

  • It seems to me that the pursuit of joy as a goal in life is ultimately fruitless, for joy is only a temporary extecy, whereas happiness is a sustained state of well-being. Do you see the difference in the two.

  • little cicero…I think we have a semantical difference. I’d define happiness and joy almost exactly opposite than you do. To me, happiness is the more fleeting, while joy is the more lasting and substantive.